Central Coast Amphitheaters

Central Coast Amphitheaters

World-class performances in small-town California
By Zachary Rosen
If Two Years Of Digital Events And Entertainment Through Zoom Has Proven Anything, It Is That There’s No Replacing Live Music. From the roar of the audience to the reverberation of the stage, seeing a live concert is a visceral experience that cannot be captured through a screen. Music venues are opening back up and bands are going on tour again — which certainly is celebratory — but with people having varying levels of comfort and safety concerns in crowds, some are hesitant to rush back to an indoor venue. Fortunately, outdoor amphitheaters offer the perfect opportunity to see live music while having some fresh air around you.

From Hands-Off to Hands-On

From Hands-Off to Hands-On

The Magic Of  Central Coast Kids’ Museums
By Tiobe Barron
If you have small humans in your life, you know they can be seemingly bottomless fonts of energy and curiosity. Playgrounds and parks can be wonderful habitats for kids to burn off steam and develop social and motor skills, but another option to encourage play and a sense of wonder is to visit a children’s museum.

Connecting the Central Coast to the World

Connecting the Central Coast to the World

By Tiobe Barron
Radio: since its inception in the early 19th century, it has been a medium that connects, informs, and even comforts during times of upheaval. In the 1930s, families in the United States would gather around “the wireless” to listen to President Franklin Roosevelt’s Fireside Chats, gleaning important goings-on of the time. As well, it united and engaged in a way that included those previously disenfranchised by print media, such as those who could not read or were sight-impaired. Important local and national events, everything from boxing matches to elections, were experienced communally in this way, united by radio broadcasts.

Los Olivos

Los Olivos

Where The Old West Meets The Modern
By Bennett Barthelemy
Los Olivos sits just two miles south of the 101 freeway along Highway 154 in the Santa Ynez Valley. The name — the olives in Spanish — comes from the 5,000 olive trees that were planted there some 150 years back. Today, the town of around 800 residents boasts about 20 wine tasting rooms, a cidery, a brew pub, upscale boutique shops, and high-caliber restaurants, all packed into just a few blocks. Many of the area’s businesses are still owned by local families, with no chain stores in sight. While strolling the streets lined with historic Victorian buildings, you can’t help but notice the wholesome downhome feel with its character and charm of Western yesteryear meets 21st century affluence.

Randy’s Recipes Winter 2021

Randy’s Recipes Winter 2021

Winter Season Citrus
By Randy Graham,
the Valley Vegetarian
What do tangerines, oranges, and lemons have in common? All are local citrus fruits available during the winter months. And although many of the tangerines and oranges may look similar on the inside, each has a distinctly different scent and flavor. The following recipes feature some of the excellent local citruses available on California’s Central Coast. My Orange Couscous recipe, for example, is made with fresh-juiced navel oranges, which are available from January through April.

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